Transparency and the Finances of Metropolises

Source: Estiator – The Restaurateur

Peter S. Makrias, Publisher-Editor
October 2013

In addition to all that we have already written about the hegemonic authority exercised by the Metropolitans of our Church in America, we must also note the fact that they do not offer an account for their actions and decisions.  Among other things, they do not offer any public accounting of their income and expenses, as the Archdiocese does at its Clergy-Laity Congresses.  It is there that the Archdiocese’s finances are discussed, along with its income from parishes and expenditures for various institutions.

The incidents involving Metropolitan Evangelos of New Jersey that were brought to our attention by members of various parish communities are a prime example.  During the recent annual celebration of the Elevation of the Cross at Asbury Park, the first tray that was passed around the congregation was earmarked for the Metropolis of New Jersey, while the funds from the particular philanthropic organization were offered to cover the needs of the Metropolis.  In addition, each year at the dance held by Pan Gregorian NJ, a check of $10,000 is given to the Metropolis- and wrongfully so.  At the most recent Clergy Laity Congress of the Metropolis of New Jersey, there were also funds collected for the Ecumenical Patriarchate. No one knows the exact amount of the funds collected, just like no one has any idea about the Metropolis’ needs, income, and expenses.

And it appears that these things are not only happening at the Metropolis of New Jersey. The time has come for Metropolises to publish an annual financial account so the faithful know where their money is going. Unless, of course, they espouse the theory advanced by Metropolitan Isaiah of Denver, according to which there should not be any proof of philanthropy being offered, because Christ does not want this, since He said that the left hand should know not what the right hand does.   However, Greek Orthodox faithful want to know precisely both what the right and left hand are doing.  It is time for transparency and participation by the laity in the decisions involving the governance of our Church.  Otherwise, this downhill slide will continue, since the second and third generations will distance themselves, as pointed out in an article from the website www.gotruthreform.org, which is included in this edition and to which we direct our readers.


 

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