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Source: Public Orthodoxy by George Persh | Русский For centuries, the Orthodox Church has taken the side of its state leadership in times of war, and the further it departed from the pacifism of the first centuries of Christianity, the more militant the rhetoric of the Church became. But the tragic events of the twentieth century posed questions for the Church to answer. The first question concerned the reaction to the end of the First World War and the Bolshevik coup in Russia. It was in the 1920s that the first timid pronouncements about the unacceptability of war and the traitorous position…

Source: Providence Magazine Originally published on February 17, 2022 By Evagelos Sotiropoulos Appeasement,” Winston Churchill once said, “is feeding the crocodile, hoping he will eat you last.” It is this approach—one of appeasement and concession—that Orthodox primates have applied to the ecclesiastical ambitions of the Moscow Patriarchate. While the 2019 granting of autocephaly, or self-governing status, to the Orthodox Church in Ukraine (OCU) by the Holy and Sacred Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate made intra-Orthodox tensions more public, the root cause of today’s growing disunity is decades in the making. Moscow’s obsessive ethnophyletism and promotion of its Russkiy Mir agenda were quietly acknowledged…

Source: Public Orthodoxy “For the peace of the whole world, for the stability of the holy churches of God, and for the unity of all, let us pray to the Lord.” (Divine Liturgy) Русский | Српски The Russian invasion of Ukraine on February 24, 2022, is a historic threat to a people of Orthodox Christian tradition. More troubling still for Orthodox believers, the senior hierarchy of the Russian Orthodox Church has refused to acknowledge this invasion, issuing instead vague statements about the necessity for peace in light of “events” and “hostilities” in Ukraine, while emphasizing the fraternal nature of the Ukrainian and…

Source: Public Orthodoxy by Heta Hurskainen | български | ქართული | ελληνικά | Română | Русский | Српски With its autonomous church in Ukraine, the Moscow Patriarchate could not accept the Patriarchate of Constantinople’s actions to grant autocephaly to the Orthodox Church in Ukraine (OCU) in 2018–2019. The Moscow Patriarchate severed its relationships with Constantinople and other primates who recognized the OCU and searched for ways to emphasize conciliarity within Orthodoxy while at the same time ignoring the Ecumenical Patriarchate’s position. The decision to establish the Patriarchal Exarchate of Africa at the turn of 2022 was a nonaccidental result of this development. The Moscow Patriarchate had already cut ties with Constantinople in 2018…

Source: Orthodox Times By Efi Efthimiou Archbishop Anastasios of Tirana and All Albania drew a parallel of the decision of the Ecumenical Patriarchate to grant the Tomos of Autocephaly to the Church of Ukraine with the illegal intrusion of the Russian Orthodox Church in the boundaries of the Patriarchate of Alexandria. In an article published today by the head of the Church of Albania, Archbishop Anastasios does not condemn the decision of the Moscow Patriarchate to establish an “Exarchate of Africa” with the acquisition of more than 100 clergymen of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate, but on the contrary, “justifies” this decision as…

Source: Public Orthodoxy by Robert C. Blitt Russia’s constitutional amendments of 2020 augur an ever-enlarging foreign policy role for the Russian Orthodox Church—Moscow Patriarchate (ROC). Constitutional entrenchment of the Kremlin’s selective understanding of state sovereignty and non-interference; a state-sanctioned vision of historical truth; the muscular protection of compatriot rights abroad; and the propagation of traditional values each tap into areas where the church has steadfastly advocated Russian civilization as a global counterweight to the West’s “ultra-liberalism.” Faced with this emerging reality, policymakers should reassess the nature and substance of their interactions with church officials and take measures to scrutinize ROC activities…

Source: Orthodox Christianity [Paris] The Archdiocese of Russian Churches in Western Europe, which largely voted to follow its hierarch, His Eminence Archbishop John of Dubna, into the Moscow Patriarchate recently, is already experiencing the fruits of this new life. Yesterday, Abp. John, who was unceremoniously released from the Patriarchate of Constantinople without warning and soon thereafter received by the Russian Church, published an address to his flock, announcing the upcoming Archbishop’s Council and General Assembly of the Archdiocese and the election of two vicar bishops. Abp. John lamented in an interview in February that while he is getting older, Constantinople never permitted the Archdiocese to elect and consecrate new…

Source: Orthodox Christianity [PARIS] On August 31, the central office of the Archdiocese of Russian Churches in Western Europe issued a communiqué in preparation for its upcoming General Assembly on September 7, outlining three points to be discussed as proposed by the Archdiocesan Council. The three points were: Acceptance of the proposed act of canonical communion with the Moscow Patriarchate; Following a meeting with the Patriarchate of Constantinople, the setting up of a bilateral dialogue in order to re-examine the possibility of a new ecclesial structure for the Archdiocese; The large-scale reforming of the Archdiocese as an autonomous structure, as…

Source: The Russian Orthodox Church Department of External Relations According to the official website of the Bulgarian Patriarchate, on March 7, 2019, Metropolitan Daniel of Vidin, a hierarch of this Church, sent a letter to His Holiness Patriarch Neophyte of Bulgaria and members of the Holy Synod of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church presenting his arguments against the Patriarch of Constantinople’s claims to primacy of power in the Orthodox world, especially against the decision to revoke the 1686 act on transfer of the Metropolia of Kiev to the jurisdiction of the Moscow Patriarchate and against Phanar’s opinion on its alleged right to…

Source: OrthoChristian.com by Kirill Alexandrov A comparison of the relationship of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church with the Moscow Patriarchate and the “Holy Church of Ukraine” with the Phanar. Petro Poroshenko and Epiphany Dumenko have received their desired tomos. Already well before that, the majority of religious experts argued that the Phanar would never give the Ukrainian Church true autocephaly, and that’s what happened. Even the most ardent supporters of autocephaly have to admit that the Ukrainian so-called autocephaly has a number of very significant restrictions. They also expressed the opinion that the new Ukrainian Church, which will be called autocephalous, will in…

Source: Sputnik News MOSCOW (Sputnik) – Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and All Russia urged the primates of all the Local Orthodox Churches to launch a general discussion of the issue with the autocephaly of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Nikolai Balashov, the deputy chair of the Moscow Patriarchate’s External Church Relations Department, told Sputnik on Tuesday. “The letters outlined the position of the Russian Orthodox Church on the issue of the so-called Ukrainian autocephaly and the possible negative consequences of the actions of the Patriarchate of Constantinople for the unity of the ecumenical Orthodoxy. They also included the proposal to undertake efforts to initiate the discussion of the current situation among all the…

Source: ERR Cornelius, the Metropolitan bishop of Tallinn and All Estonia and head of the Estonian Orthodox Church of Moscow Patriarchate, died at age 93 on Thursday. The church announced his death on social media on Thursday afternoon. Metropolitan Cornelius was born Vjatšeslav Vassiljevitš Jakobs in Tallinn on June 19, 1924. From 1960-1990, Cornelius served as a priest (high priest beginning in 1966) at the Church of St. John the Forerunner in Tallinn’s Nõmme District. From 1990-1992, Cornelius bore the title of Bishop of Tallinn and Estonia, from 1992-1995 the title of Bishop of Tallinn and All Estonia, from 1995-2000 the title of Archbishop of Tallinn…