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Source: Festival of Orthodox Christian Arts Saints Constantine and Helen Antiochian Orthodox Church in Carrollton, Texas, is hosting a Festival of Orthodox Christian Arts, February 18-20. All the Orthodox parishes of the Dallas – Fort Worth area and the entire DFW community are invited to “taste and see” the flowering of creativity that springs from Orthodox Christian spirituality. Festival events begin Friday evening with an address by Dr. Peter Bouteneff of St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary on “The Role of the Arts in Orthodox Theology.” A choral performance by the St. Kassiani Chorale, a regional pan-Orthodox choir, will follow. Saturday…

Source: The Wheel The pandemic now ravaging the Orthodox Church is not only COVID-19 but also fundamentalism. Fundamentalism is a sort of populism for the church. It is based on post-truth and conspiracy theories. Although it pretends to be pietistic, it is quite secular and secularizing. I would apply to fundamentalism the phrase once coined by Dietrich Bonhoeffer, “cheap grace.” Fundamentalism is a cheap spirituality and a cheap substitute for genuine ecclesial existence. The circumstances of the COVID 19 epidemic demonstrate that fundamentalism not only corrupts minds and muddies faith, but can also kill bodies. It is time to treat…

Source: The New York Times We are spiritual beings. That’s why I joined the millions of people who make some form of religious pilgrimage. By Timothy Egan Not long ago, I found myself inside a place that claims to be the oldest church in the English-speaking world — St. Martin’s in Canterbury, England, a few steps from the start of the ancient pilgrimage trail of the Via Francigena. It was my first stop on a pathway of more than a thousand miles, a trail from that modest clump of sixth-century stone and brick to the Vatican home of a pope struggling…

Source: Orthodox Christian Network By Seraphim Danckaert in The Sounding Protopresbyter Thomas Hopko reposed in the Lord on March 18 of this year. He was an influential figure in American Orthodoxy, in part due to his long tenure at St. Vladimir’s Seminary and in part due to the popular nature of his lectures, talks, and writings. He spoke well and spoke frequently, addressing himself most especially to lay people and clergy. He was a pastor by nature, concerned with the life of the Church and its witness to the modern world. Several years ago, he published 55 “maxims”…

Source: Commonweal by John Garvey I have served as a priest in the Orthodox Church in America for twenty-two years. The parishes where I’ve served have been varied. For ten years I was the pastor of an Albanian Orthodox church in Queens, during the period when Communism fell in Albania. The parish population doubled, with an influx of immigrants who were eager to be part of the church after having been denied any opportunity to worship by the world’s most fiercely atheistic regime. My second church was a more typical OCA parish on Long Island, most of whose members were lifelong…